Sir Run Run and Adventist ‘China Doctor, Dr Harry Miller

I found it rewarding and inspiring to read about Dr. Harry Miller, The China Doctor. But first, Sir Run Run Shaw who died 7th January 2014 at the age of 106. Following from a previous post it was interesting to read about Sir Run Run Shaw and his connection with Loma Linda University Health Care. LLU Remembered Sir Run Run Shaw earlier this year,  a Philanthropist and Humanitarian in the World of Health Care. The Media Mogul Partnered with Loma Linda University to Bring Western Medicine to the Zhejiang Province in the People’s Republic of China.

“Not one to hoard his wealth, Shaw donated billions of dollars to charity over the years, most recently contributing $13 million for disaster relief after the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake. His name adorns many hospital and school buildings in China and Hong Kong.”

But how did Sir Run Run Shaw’s connection with Adventist Health Care come about? It appears it was down to one man, Dr. Harry Miller, referred to as ‘The China Doctor.’   “Sir Run Run Shaw’s mother had received treatment from Dr. Harry Miller, an Adventist physician, at a progressive hospital in China. He was impressed by the compassionate, whole-person care provided to all echelons of society, from government officials to day laborers. As a result, he vowed to one day bring a similar level of care to his own community.

“He never forgot the excellent care his mother had received from Dr. Miller,” says Joan Coggin, MD, MPH, former vice president for global outreach, Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center.

When Sir Run Run Shaw initiated plans to build a hospital, he asked the Seventh-day Adventist Church and Loma Linda University and Medical Center to become involved in the process.

Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital officially opened on May 9, 1994 as a 400-bed facility providing Western-style services in all of the medical specialties practiced in the United States. The hospital received Joint Commission International Accreditation in December 2006, making it the first in China to achieve this level of recognition and success; it was subsequently re-credited in 2009 and 2013. Today the 1,200-bed tertiary care hospital treats more than 6,000 patients a day.”

Says, Loma linda University President, Richard Hart

“By any standard, China is impressive today. With its 1.3 billion people, dozens of crowded cities, and forests of apartment buildings reaching the sky—and requiring huge investments in infrastructure—this country is preparing for the future. While we build 100-bed hospitals, they build 1,000-bed hospitals. In fact they have driven up the price of cement worldwide due to their insatiable demand for construction.

“And yet,” says the LLU president, for those who have the privilege of visiting China, it is not their impressive size or growth, not their international press coverage, and not even their development or exports that distinguishes China today. It is surely the gracious attitude, the always solicitous approach to strangers, that one remembers after each visit.

“Sir Run Run Shaw had been impressed by the compassionate, whole-person care provided to all echelons of society, from government officials to day laborers. As a result, he vowed to one day bring a similar level of care to his own community.

“He never forgot the excellent care his mother had received from Dr. Miller,” says Joan Coggin, MD, MPH, former vice president for global outreach, Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center.

When Sir Run Run Shaw initiated plans to build a hospital, he asked the Seventh-day Adventist Church and Loma Linda University and Medical Center to become involved in the process.

But there is much more to read on Dr. Harry Miller. Page 2 of this link gives us some idea of the extent of respect for Dr. Harry Miller’s expertise and mission in China. This bio concludes:

“Dr. Miller died on new Year’s day, 1977, at the age of 97, just as he was getting ready to go to his beloved church.

“Harry Miller was a shining example of what the Chinese call “The Great Man.” He dedicated his life to the welfare of all beings, human and nonhuman. He chose a life of voluntary simplicity, finding his real joy in giving. Close associates estimate that, in professional fees alone, he turned over some $2.5 million to the hospitals, church, and nutritional work with which he was connected. Spiritual values were at the center of his life. Though world famous, he was the most humble of men; though very busy, he had time for each person who needed him. His vision was fifty years ahead of his time. He left an indelible impression on the world. Would that he could be here with us now to see the blossoming of his work in America and around the globe.

More on Dr. Harry Miller here, and back to here. A remarkable Christian man to read about.

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